Calif. Retailers Urged to Tell Their Recycling Stories

The state association anticipates pushback from opponents of the Commonsense Recycling Act, which currently sits on the governor’s desk.

September 19, 2018

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Earlier this month, the California Assembly approved the California Beverage Container Recycle and Litter Reduction Act, which corrects an unfair burden placed on retailers. Current California law states that all retailers of recyclable beverage containers that are not within a half-mile of a recycling facility must either serve as a recycling center for the public at the retailer’s expense or pay a $100 daily fine until recycling standards are achieved at the location.

The Commonsense Recycling Act currently awaits the governor’s signature, but the California Fuels and Convenience Alliance (CFCA) says the law isn’t quite a done deal. “We think there will be some interests trying to pull the governor away from signing this good policy,” Ryan Q. Hanretty, CFCA executive director, told NACS Daily. “We’re asking all California retailers to contact Gov. Jerry Brown with their stories about owning and operating a convenience store and the impacts of the current law. The fuels and convenience industry must speak up from every district and corner of California to urge the governor to sign this bill into law.”

In a new NACS report, Convenience Store Industry’s Take on Trash, consumers reveal their perceptions about c-stores as they relate to litter and recycling. In addition, NACS retail members reveal the steps they take, or are considering, to implement sustainable practices such as litter management and recycling.

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