Tyson Foodservice Launches ‘What’s on the Line?’ Campaign

The new customer-centric belief system provides curated options for foodservice operators.
January 25, 2017

SPRINGDALE, Ark. – To help today’s foodservice decision-makers deal with concerns such as increased competition, rapidly changing tastes and trends, and rising rents and wages, Tyson Foodservice is transforming into a customer-centric enterprise that understands what’s “on the line” for operators. In this unique role, Tyson Foodservice will challenge team members to help reduce risk and frustration on the operators so they have greater opportunities for success.

This division, named Tyson Foodservice Teams, is comprised of small, specialized “Foodservice Teams” focused on its main channels, including restaurant, college and university, K-12, health care, convenience, hospitality and military. Each specialty team is trained to actively listen to operators and keep abreast of the economic climate, emerging trends and operational issues that impact their reality. Ultimately, the goal of Tyson Foodservice Teams is to provide carefully curated solutions, insights and trusted counsel necessary to help fuel an operator’s success and competitive advantage.

“It seems many operators may feel that food companies are ‘out of touch,’” said Kim Cupelli, vice president of marketing for Tyson Foods, in a press release. “We aim to change that perception by supplying our customers with not only high quality proteins for the center of plate but also experienced, empathetic teams who can play a trusted, consultative role focused on their success.”

In support of this effort, Tyson Foodservice Teams launched an extensive “What’s On The Line?” marketing and training effort focused on understanding and valuing what’s at stake for operators. This renewed belief system and rebrand includes:

  • a new “core credo”
  • individualized channel teams with unique logo treatments for each
  • support and resource materials focused on each unique channel
  • a website revamp with channel-specific content for operators

“The relationship I'm looking for with a food purveyor is not just supplying us with ingredients, but providing us with solutions to achieve the perfection that all of us hope to achieve,” said Chef Will McCormick of MOD Restaurant & Social. “They need to listen and know we are ‘working our tails off’ day-in and day-out in chaos in order to make our dollars to pay rent, pay our mortgages and achieve our dreams. We want a supplier that's going to know our business—and grow our business with us.”

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