The Charge of the Future

This week’s Convenience Matters podcast covers how to build a usable electric charging infrastructure.

October 17, 2018

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – On this week’s episode of Convenience Matters, “Electrify Gas Stations of the Future,” Jeff Lenard, NACS vice president of strategic industry initiatives, and Donovan Woods, director of operations for the Fuels Institute, talk with Rachel Moses, Electrify America’s senior manager site acquisition for development and strategy about America’s electric vehicle future.

As part of the Volkswagen settlement with the U.S. government, Electrify America will be investing $2 billion into building a national network that will enable electric vehicles to traverse the country. The first cycle of this program will involve building “a national highway of infrastructures to allow electric vehicles to traverse the country,” Moses said. The initial goal is to have DC fast chargers in 17 metro cities, as well as launch an EV brand awareness campaign.

Electrify America is looking for “purposed-placed infrastructure” in places where people want to spend time. “We’re looking at highly trafficked areas across the country … [with no more] than 120 miles between sites, with an average distance of around 70 miles,” Moses said. She pointed out that the charging technology that will be put in will have a higher charging speed (0% to 100% within 15 minutes), yet still service older EV models too. “We’re committed to building this network for the vehicles of today and for the future,” Moses said.

The initiative has partnered with a handful of fueling providers, including Casey’s General Store, Kum & Go and Sheetz, as well as Target and Walmart. “We see those captive customers as very attractive to fueling providers as well as convenience store operators,” she said.

Each week a new Convenience Matters episode is released. The podcast can be downloaded on iTunes, Google Play and other podcast apps, and at www.conveniencematters.com. Episodes have been downloaded by listeners more than 60,000 times in 80 countries.

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